Human Rights And Humanitarian Intervention

Author: Elizabeth M. Bruch
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317274946
Size: 70.51 MB
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Human rights, peacekeeping, and humanitarian intervention have emerged in the past decades as important components of international law and practice. Adopting a methodology of Institutional Ethnography informed by Actor-Network Theory, this book traces the practices of law and expertise from global IGO headquarters to the ‘field’ and back again, and through various contemporary field missions from Bosnia to Afghanistan and East Timor to Sierra Leone. It answers several fundamental questions: How is human rights law engaged in ‘establishing the peace,’ ‘rebuilding the nation,’ and ‘restoring the rule of law’ in post-conflict situations? How do human rights experts use law in their everyday work in the context of humanitarian intervention? How are law and expertise established, sustained and transformed in the field? Offering a complex and nuanced explanation of humanitarian intervention based upon a multi-dimensional understanding of law and power, this book will be of interest and use to scholars, students and practitioners in international law and policy, human rights, and humanitarian intervention. Its cross-disciplinary approach should also appeal to the professional communities engaged directly and indirectly with projects of humanitarian intervention – including staff at inter-governmental organizations, international lawyers and practitioners, and activists.

International Human Rights Law And Practice

Author: Ilias Bantekas
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107354471
Size: 50.30 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Human rights law is a complex but compelling subject that fascinates students but also confuses them. This innovative textbook explores human rights law from a theoretical and practical perspective. Case studies and interviews with specialist practitioners, NGO activists and policy-makers show how theory is applied in real life. The up-to-date coverage includes introductions to important emerging fields such as globalisation, poverty and advocacy. Student learning is supported by questions to stimulate seminar discussion and further reading sections that encourage independent study. The authors' combined expertise, engaging writing style and ability to clarify not simplify ensures that this important new book will become required reading for all students of human rights law.

Reading Humanitarian Intervention

Author: Anne Orford
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9781139435710
Size: 65.50 MB
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During the 1990s, humanitarian intervention seemed to promise a world in which democracy, self-determination and human rights would be privileged over national interests or imperial ambitions. Orford provides critical readings of the narratives that accompanied such interventions and shaped legal justifications for the use of force by the international community. Through a close reading of legal texts and institutional practice, she argues that a far more circumscribed, exploitative and conservative interpretation of the ends of intervention was adopted during this period. The book draws on a wide range of sources, including critical legal theory, feminist and postcolonial theory, psychoanalytic theory and critical geography, to develop ways of reading directed at thinking through the cultural and economic effects of militarized humanitarianism. The book concludes by asking what, if anything, has been lost in the move from the era of humanitarian intervention to an international relations dominated by wars on terror.

The Politics Of International Law

Author: Martti Koskenniemi
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 1847317766
Size: 64.34 MB
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Today international law is everywhere. Wars are fought and opposed in its name. It is invoked to claim rights and to challenge them, to indict or support political leaders, to distribute resources and to expand or limit the powers of domestic and international institutions. International law is part of the way political (and economic) power is used, critiqued, and sometimes limited. Despite its claim for neutrality and impartiality, it is implicit in what is just, as well as what is unjust in the world. To understand its operation requires shedding its ideological spell and examining it with a cold eye. Who are its winners, and who are its losers? How - if at all - can it be used to make a better or a less unjust world? In this collection of essays Professor Martti Koskenniemi, a well-known practitioner and a leading theorist and historian of international law, examines the recent debates on humanitarian intervention, collective security, protection of human rights and the 'fight against impunity' and reflects on the use of the professional techniques of international law to intervene politically. The essays both illustrate and expand his influential theory of the role of international law in international politics. The book is prefaced with an introduction by Professor Emmanuelle Jouannet (Sorbonne Law School), which locates the texts in the overall thought and work of Martti Koskenniemi.

The Political Sociology Of Human Rights

Author: Kate Nash
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 052119749X
Size: 76.12 MB
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A sociological approach to human rights, showing how rights language is used to address structural injustices around the world.

Counter Terrorism

Author: Ana Salinas de Frías
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 019960892X
Size: 21.81 MB
Format: PDF
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Government responses to terrorism can conflict with the protection of human rights and the rule of law. By comprehensively looking at all aspects of counter-terrorism measures from a comparative perspective, this book identifies best practices and makes clear recommendations for the future.

The Practice Of Humanitarian Intervention

Author: Kai Koddenbrock
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317481003
Size: 77.44 MB
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This book examines the practices in Western and local spheres of humanitarian intervention, and shows how the divide between these spheres helps to perpetuate Western involvement. Using the Democratic Republic of the Congo as a case study – an object of Western intervention since colonial times – this book scrutinizes the contemporary practice of humanitarian intervention from the inside. It seeks to expose how humanitarian aid and peacekeeping works, what obstacles they encounter and how they manage to retain their legitimacy. By examining the relationship between the West and the DR Congo, this volume asks why intervention continues to be so central for the relationship between Western and local spheres. Why is it normal and self-evident? The main answer developed here is that the separation of these two spheres allows intervention to enjoy sufficient degrees of legitimacy to be sustained. Owing to the contradictions that surface when juxtaposing the Western and Congolese spheres, this book highlights how keeping them separate is key to sustaining intervention. Bridging the divide between the liberal peace debate in International Relations and anthropologies of humanitarianism, this volume thus presents an important contribution to taking both the legitimizing proclamations and ‘local’ realities of intervention seriously. The book will be of much interest to students of statebuilding, peacebuilding, peacekeeping, anthropology, research methods and IR in general.

Order And Justice In International Relations

Author: Rosemary Foot
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191530654
Size: 69.17 MB
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The relationship between international order and justice has long been central to the study and practice of international relations. For most of the twentieth century, states and international society gave priority to a view of order that focused on the minimum conditions for coexistence in a pluralist, conflictual world. Justice was seen either as secondary or sometimes even as a challenge to order. Recent developments have forced a reassessment of this position. Firstly, many trends in the 1990s increased expectations of greater justice within a liberal and liberalizing international order - for example, in relation to human rights, humanitarian intervention, collective security, and self-determination. Second, globalization deepened the sense of ideational and material interdependence, prompting acknowledgement that we co-exist in a single world and that effective solutions to shared problems cannot be achieved without a concern for justice - especially as the negative aspects of globalization have become more evident. Third, claims to justice and critiques of the existing order have been forcefully pressed by an increasing range of non-governmental and other groups within transnational civil society. These three developments suggest movement towards a greater solidarist consciousness and ambition, based primarily on a liberal vision of the relationship between order and justice. This book sets current concerns within a broad historical and theoretical context; explores the depth and scope of this presumed solidarism amidst the difficulties of acting on the basis of a more strongly articulated liberal position; and underscores the complexity and abiding tensions inherent in the relationship between order and justice. Chapters examine a wide range of state and transnational perspectives on order and justice, including those from China, India, Russia, the United States, and the Islamic world. Other chapters investigate how the order-justice relationship is mediated within major international institutions, including the United Nations, the World Trade Organization and the global financial institutions.

International Society Global Polity

Author: Chris Brown
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 1473911281
Size: 35.82 MB
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This book provides an overview of the current state of the art in International Political Theory (IPT). It offers a coherent account of the field of IPT, placing both traditional and modern work in a clear and logical framework. The text moves from conventional accounts of the society of states to non-state-centric understandings of global politics. The first part covers international law, war, human rights and humanitarianism. The second part looks at the new human rights regime, the responsibility to protect, the ethics of war and global justice. Each chapter includes annotated reading lists, highlighting directions you can take to further your reading. International Society, Global Polity is perfect for students taking courses on International Political Theory, International Theory, Global Ethics and Global Justice.