Youth Identity And Digital Media

Author: David Buckingham
Publisher: The MIT Press
ISBN:
Size: 68.82 MB
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Contributors discuss how growing up in a world saturated with digital media affects the development of young people's individual and social identities.Read the complete open access edition HERE.

Digital Media Youth And Credibility

Author: Miriam J. Metzger
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 0262062739
Size: 12.53 MB
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The difficulties in determining the quality of information on the Internet--inparticular, the implications of wide access and questionable credibility for youth andlearning.

Hanging Out Messing Around And Geeking Out

Author: Mizuko Ito
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 0262258269
Size: 28.65 MB
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Conventional wisdom about young people's use of digital technology often equates generational identity with technology identity: today's teens seem constantly plugged in to video games, social networking sites, and text messaging. Yet there is little actual research that investigates the intricate dynamics of youths' social and recreational use of digital media. Hanging Out, Messing Around, and Geeking Out fills this gap, reporting on an ambitious three-year ethnographic investigation into how young people are living and learning with new media in varied settings -- at home, in after-school programs, and in online spaces. Integrating twenty-three case studies -- which include Harry Potter podcasting, video-game playing, music sharing, and online romantic breakups -- in a unique collaborative authorship style, Hanging Out, Messing Around, and Geeking Out is distinctive for its combination of in-depth description of specific group dynamics with conceptual analysis.

The App Generation

Author: Howard Gardner
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 030019918X
Size: 25.75 MB
Format: PDF
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No one has failed to notice that the current generation of youth is deeply--some would say totally--involved with digital media. Professors Howard Gardner and Katie Davis name today's young people The App Generation, and in this spellbinding book they explore what it means to be "app-dependent" versus "app-enabled" and how life for this generation differs from life before the digital era. Gardner and Davis are concerned with three vital areas of adolescent life: identity, intimacy, and imagination. Through innovative research, including interviews of young people, focus groups of those who work with them, and a unique comparison of youthful artistic productions before and after the digital revolution, the authors uncover the drawbacks of apps: they may foreclose a sense of identity, encourage superficial relations with others, and stunt creative imagination. On the other hand, the benefits of apps are equally striking: they can promote a strong sense of identity, allow deep relationships, and stimulate creativity. The challenge is to venture beyond the ways that apps are designed to be used, Gardner and Davis conclude, and they suggest how the power of apps can be a springboard to greater creativity and higher aspirations.

Young People Ethics And The New Digital Media

Author: Carrie James
Publisher: Mit Press
ISBN: 9780262513630
Size: 39.59 MB
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Researchers explore the ethical fault lines of young people's new media engagement and propose a model of "good play."

Youth Drinking Cultures In A Digital World

Author: Antonia Lyons
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 1317338332
Size: 77.64 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Social media has helped boost the culture of intoxication, a central aspect of young people’s social lives in many Western countries. Initial research suggests that these technologies enable highly-nuanced, targeted marketing and innovations – creating new virtual spaces that alter the dynamics and consequences of drinking cultures in significant ways. Youth Drinking Cultures in a Digital World focuses on how pervasive social networking technologies contribute to drinking cultures. It brings together international contributions from leading researchers in this emerging field to explore how new technologies are reconfiguring the key themes, traditional interests, practices and concerns of alcohol-related research with young people. It is particularly concerned with three important areas, namely: identities, social relations and power alcohol marketing and commercialisation public health and regulating alcohol promotion. This innovative book includes original research and commentary and is a must-read for academics and researchers in the areas of public health, psychology, sociology, media studies, youth studies and alcohol studies.

Living And Learning With New Media

Author: Mizuko Ito
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 0262258277
Size: 53.71 MB
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This report summarizes the results of an ambitious three-year ethnographic study, funded by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, into how young people are living and learning with new media in varied settings -- at home, in after school programs, and in online spaces. It offers a condensed version of a longer treatment provided in the book Hanging Out, Messing Around, and Geeking Out (MIT Press, 2009). The authors present empirical data on new media in the lives of American youth in order to reflect upon the relationship between new media and learning. In one of the largest qualitative and ethnographic studies of American youth culture, the authors view the relationship of youth and new media not simply in terms of technology trends but situated within the broader structural conditions of childhood and the negotiations with adults that frame the experience of youth in the United States.The book that this report summarizes was written as a collaborative effort by members of the Digital Youth Project, a three-year research effort funded by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation and conducted at the University of California, Berkeley, and the University of Southern California.John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Reports on Digital Media and Learning

Social Movements And Media

Author: Jennifer S. Earl
Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing
ISBN: 1787431754
Size: 33.88 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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This volume focuses on media and social movements. Contributing authors draw on cases as diverse as the Harry Potter Alliance to youth oriented, non-profit educational organizations to systematically assess how media environments, systems, and usage affect collective action in the 21st Century.

Youth Practices In Digital Arts And New Media Learning In Formal And Informal Settings

Author: J. Black
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 113747517X
Size: 37.78 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 476

The authors examine youths' practices in digital culture affecting social change, pedagogy, and creative learning practices. Knowledge about these practices is discussed, in which learning, knowledge sharing, distinct social contexts, pedagogical relationships, and artistic creative inquiry are examined in diverse formal and informal environments.

Disconnected

Author: Carrie James
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 0262325578
Size: 30.74 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 5880

Fresh from a party, a teen posts a photo on Facebook of a friend drinking a beer. A college student repurposes an article from Wikipedia for a paper. A group of players in a multiplayer online game routinely cheat new players by selling them worthless virtual accessories for high prices. In Disconnected, Carrie James examines how young people and the adults in their lives think about these sorts of online dilemmas, describing ethical blind spots and disconnects. Drawing on extensive interviews with young people between the ages of 10 and 25, James describes the nature of their thinking about privacy, property, and participation online. She identifies three ways that young people approach online activities. A teen might practice self-focused thinking, concerned mostly about consequences for herself; moral thinking, concerned about the consequences for people he knows; or ethical thinking, concerned about unknown individuals and larger communities. James finds, among other things, that youth are often blind to moral or ethical concerns about privacy; that attitudes toward property range from "what's theirs is theirs" to "free for all"; that hostile speech can be met with a belief that online content is "just a joke"; and that adults who are consulted about such dilemmas often emphasize personal safety issues over online ethics and citizenship. Considering ways to address the digital ethics gap, James offers a vision of conscientious connectivity, which involves ethical thinking skills but, perhaps more important, is marked by sensitivity to the dilemmas posed by online life, a motivation to wrestle with them, and a sense of moral agency that supports socially positive online actions.