The Lives Of Frederick Douglass

Author: Robert S. Levine
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674055810
Size: 31.46 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Frederick Douglass’s changeable sense of his own life story is reflected in his many conflicting accounts of events during his journey from slavery to freedom. Robert S. Levine creates a fascinating collage of this elusive subject—revisionist biography at its best, offering new perspectives on Douglass the social reformer, orator, and writer.

Narrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass An American Slave

Author: Frederick Douglass
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300225296
Size: 60.35 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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A new edition of one of the most influential literary documents in American and African American history Ideal for coursework in American and African American history, this revised edition of Frederick Douglass’s memoir of his life as a slave in pre-Civil War Maryland incorporates a wide range of supplemental materials to enhance students’ understanding of slavery, abolitionism, and the role of race in American society. Offering readers a new appreciation of Douglass’s world, it includes documents relating to the slave narrative genre and to the later career of an essential figure in the nineteenth-century abolition movement.

Giants

Author: John Stauffer
Publisher: Twelve
ISBN: 0446543004
Size: 74.20 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln were the preeminent self-made men of their time. In this masterful dual biography, award-winning Harvard University scholar John Stauffer describes the transformations in the lives of these two giants during a major shift in cultural history, when men rejected the status quo and embraced new ideals of personal liberty. As Douglass and Lincoln reinvented themselves and ultimately became friends, they transformed America. Lincoln was born dirt poor, had less than one year of formal schooling, and became the nation's greatest president. Douglass spent the first twenty years of his life as a slave, had no formal schooling-in fact, his masters forbade him to read or write-and became one of the nation's greatest writers and activists, as well as a spellbinding orator and messenger of audacious hope, the pioneer who blazed the path traveled by future African-American leaders. At a time when most whites would not let a black man cross their threshold, Lincoln invited Douglass into the White House. Lincoln recognized that he needed Douglass to help him destroy the Confederacy and preserve the Union; Douglass realized that Lincoln's shrewd sense of public opinion would serve his own goal of freeing the nation's blacks. Their relationship shifted in response to the country's debate over slavery, abolition, and emancipation. Both were ambitious men. They had great faith in the moral and technological progress of their nation. And they were not always consistent in their views. John Stauffer describes their personal and political struggles with a keen understanding of the dilemmas Douglass and Lincoln confronted and the social context in which they occurred. What emerges is a brilliant portrait of how two of America's greatest leaders lived.

The Narrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass

Author: Frederick Douglass
Publisher: BookRix
ISBN: 373680072X
Size: 11.82 MB
Format: PDF
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Frederick Douglass was born in slavery as Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey near Easton in Talbot County, Maryland. He was not sure of the exact year of his birth, but he knew that it was 1817 or 1818. As a young boy he was sent to Baltimore, to be a house servant, where he learned to read and write, with the assistance of his master's wife. In 1838 he escaped from slavery and went to New York City, where he married Anna Murray, a free colored woman whom he had met in Baltimore. Soon thereafter he changed his name to Frederick Douglass. In 1841 he addressed a convention of the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society in Nantucket and so greatly impressed the group that they immediately employed him as an agent. He was such an impressive orator that numerous persons doubted if he had ever been a slave, so he wrote Narrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass. During the Civil War he assisted in the recruiting of colored men for the 54th and 55th Massachusetts Regiments and consistently argued for the emancipation of slaves. After the war he was active in securing and protecting the rights of the freemen. In his later years, at different times, he was secretary of the Santo Domingo Commission, marshall and recorder of deeds of the District of Columbia, and United States Minister to Haiti. His other autobiographical works are My Bondage And My Freedom and Life And Times Of Frederick Douglass, published in 1855 and 1881 respectively. He died in 1895.

Narrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass Written By Himself Full Text Introduction By Atidem Aroha

Author: Frederick Douglass
Publisher: Alejandro's Libros
ISBN: 1490975837
Size: 76.16 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 1187

Frederick Douglass was a man of his time and race, a leader and fighter against the irrational and inhuman treatment of the blacks. This narrative is one of the most influential among African-American books denouncing the Institution of Slavery. It was written in 1845, over fifty years after the narrative of the great son of Africa Olaudah Equiano (1797). Being a slave himself, the accounts Douglass narrates are very important as a primary source describing the endurances and tribulations he had suffered under the slavery of the Southern territories, especially in Maryland. His life was full of bitterness, grief and sorrow; but certainly he became a great man indeed...also against all odds.